Facebook's Sandberg favors release of Russia-linked ads

Facebook's Sandberg favors release of Russia-linked ads

Sandberg said the company began hearing rumors of Russian attempts to use the platform to spread propaganda around election day, but did not give a precise timeline about when the company began its review.

The company disclosed last month that it found ads linked to fake accounts - likely run from Russian Federation - that sought to influence the election.

Sandberg added that when official the investigation is complete, Facebook would release the information to the public and explain further about how it happened.

"Things happened on our platform in this election that should not have happened", Sandberg said.

Following Ms Sandberg's comments, Representative Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said that they would eventually release those ads.

United States lawmakers have said they planned to release the ads placed on Facebook once any personal information on users is removed.

Mobile Caps Roaming Data In Mexico And Canada Starting November 12
Get off a plane in Puerto Vallarta, Poughkeepsie or Prince Edward, and you'll have the same outstanding Un-carrier experience. In order to prevent usage beyond the intent of the product , we implemented a limit on the amount of monthly 4G LTE data.

MINI to build cars in China with Great Wall
It appears that MINI production is about to venture into China for the first time, if a report by Bloomberg is to be believed. BMW said that this approach did not put into question its commitment to Mini factories in the U.K.

Yankees hurler Tanaka to start ACLS Game 1 in Houston
While the Yanks were embarking on their improbable comeback against the Indians, the Astros were at home eating popcorn. NY came back from a 2-0 series deficit in the ALDS, beating the Cleveland Indians on the road in a deciding Game 5.

The move comes as critics and lawmakers are increasingly calling for the regulation of Facebook and other internet giants. Sandberg is no stranger to Washington.

"Absolutely", Ms Sandberg told Axios when asked if she supported releasing those ads publicly.

Sandberg's meeting with the caucus was just the latest stop in an apology tour launched after Facebook faced harsh criticism for denying, back tracking, then finally admitting the key role it played in Russia's disinformation campaign.

"None of us should want this kind of foreign interference and in others to prevent it, we are all going to have to fully cooperate with each other, with government, across the board", Sandberg said. If the Russian ads had been bought by legitimate accounts instead of fraudulent ones, many of them would have been allowed to run on the site, she said.

Facebook's CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, has backtracked from calling the idea of Facebook's influence on the election "pretty insane".

Rep. Cedric Richmond, a Democrat from Louisiana who chairs the caucus, said that 95 percent of the 3,000 ads were placed on Facebook itself, while the remaining five percent were on Instagram. Facebook has eight board members, all white.

Related Articles